Blog Compilation by Michael Nunnally (Sir_Templar)  July 10,2017

After the Gulf Oil DISASTER, we RESEARCHED diligently after sensing something was wrong, (We knew deep in our gut it wasn’t adding up, ONCE AGAIN) – this set us out on a quest of a lifetime to find answers that were not forthcoming. We spent hours collecting data, transcripts of interviews, EVERYTHING.
It hit home as many of them (the locals) volunteers participated in cleaning the spill died or got violently and needs to be explored further with greater resources. Like I said, it didn’t add up. Then YouTube videos were being made reveling the rashes, ORGANIC lab results. At the same time, articles were about ALGAE based biofuels in both freshwater, salt and brackish waters.
Other Items from the point of the explosion to within 24 hours. :
1) Media Blackouts and they had civilian contractors on the grounds in somecases threatening behavior toward those who would openly oppose otherwise.
2) SWAT teams being deployed to remaining oil platforms.
3) – BP’s (British Petroleum) shall we say most said was problematic.
4) There was one insider I believe someone contacted with and got info from.
5) Someone discovered that the 24×7 operations had photo-shopped monitors (several) in the BP Control Room Image
– This is just to illustrate collusion, actions that took place in order to contain.
– We had said exactly this concerning ‘RED TIDE’ and the Gulf had been intentionally poisoned so to produce BIOMASS such as algae that was GMO and required no sunlight (photosynthesis).

Resources:

https://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/07/flesh-eating_bacteria_vibrio_f.html

By Leada Gore [email protected]  07/07/2017

The Alabama Department of Public Health is warning people with cuts, abrasions and certain health conditions to avoid the water after reports of three cases of flesh-eating bacteria.
The bacteria – known as Vibrio – is found in lakes, rivers, along the coast and in other warm, brackish bodies of water. The bacteria can lead to destructive soft-tissue infections and other illnesses.

Vibrio is found in lakes, rivers, along the coast and in other warm, brackish bodies of water.   The bacteria can lead to                        destructive soft-tissue infections and other illnesses. (Contributed photo/CDC)

“Most soft-tissue infections occur with either injury or with conditions such as poorly controlled diabetes or low immunity. However, sometimes otherwise healthy people can develop a skin infection after skin injury and being exposed to natural bodies of water. Some bacteria can cause more severe infections than others,” said Dr. Karen Landers, Assistant State Health Officer, ADPH.
Three cases of flesh-eating bacteria have been reported in Alabama since March. One case involved the consumption of raw oysters from another state, the other two people – both of whom had open wounds – contracted the bacteria in water near Mobile Bay, the Mississippi sound and Dauphin Island areas. All of the victims have recovered from their illnesses.

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https://wkrg.com/2017/07/07/breaking-alabama-department-of-health-expands-vibrio-warning/

WKRG Staff  Published: July 7, 2017, 4:34 pm

MOBILE, Ala. (WKRG) — The Alabama Health Department is warning citizens to avoid entering bodies of water if you have cuts or abrasion. If you are injured, clean the wound at once to reduce risk of infection.
Many harmful organisms lurk in lakes, rivers, along the coast, and in other bodies of water. Some bacteria may lead to destructive soft-tissue infections and other illnesses, the Alabama Department of Public Health cautions.

“Most soft-tissue infections occur with either injury or with conditions such as poorly controlled diabetes or low immunity. However, sometimes otherwise healthy people can develop a skin infection after skin injury and being exposed to natural bodies of water. Some bacteria can cause more severe infections than others,” said Dr. Karen Landers, Assistant State Health Officer, ADPH.

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https://whnt.com/2017/07/08/alabama-department-of-public-health-warns-of-flesh-eating-bacteria-danger/

Posted 1:05 pm, July 8, 2017, by WHNT News 19

MOBILE, Ala. – The Alabama Department of Public Health is warning people with cuts, abrasions and certain health conditions to avoid the water after reports of three cases of flesh-eating bacteria.

The coast of Dauphin Island (Photo: Getty Images)

Vibrio vulnificus is found in lakes, rivers, along the coast and in other warm, brackish bodies of water. The bacteria can lead to destructive soft-tissue infections and other illnesses.

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https://www.galvestontx.gov/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=466

Posted on: February 23, 2017 By Scott Packard

About Vibrio vulnificus
Vibrio vulnificus is not associated with pollution and is not unique to the Gulf of Mexico, Texas or Galveston. The bacteria is naturally present in salt and brackish water around the world. Infections from Vibrio vulnificus are rare and typically affect people with pre-existing health conditions who had open cuts or sores when they came into contact with the bacteria.

Click here for a PDF version of this infographic.

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28551603

BMJ Case Rep. 2017 May 27;2017. pii: bcr-2017-220199. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2017-220199.
Vibrio vulnificus septic shock due to a contaminated tattoo.

We present a case of Vibrio vulnificus septic shock and cellulitis in a patient with chronic liver disease that occurred after obtaining a leg tattoo with subsequent seawater exposure in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Contribution by:  Kellie Mitchell

https://gulfcoastnewstoday.com/stories/woman-contracts-flesh-eating-bacteria-in-fairhope,51128

Woman contracts flesh-eating bacteria in Fairhope

Posted Monday, July 3, 2017 3:05 pm By:  By Allison Marlow

This photo shows the progression of the vibrio vulfinicus bacteria on the hand of a 70-year-old, former school teacher from Mississippi. The bacteria is often called flesh-eating because of how quickly it destroys layers of tissue. The woman frequently visits Fairhope with her husband and was at the Fairhope Pier when she says contracted the bacteria.

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Michael Nunnally writes “The cause was a waterborne bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, and Mark Trice had the MODIS imagery to show how this lethal microorganism could have found a home in Chesapeake Bay.”

https://earthdata.nasa.gov/user-resources/who-uses-nasa-earth-science-data-user-profiles/user-profile-mark-trice

Work and research highlights: In 2005, a fisherman crabbing on Maryland’s Eastern Shore was pinched in the leg by a crab. Shortly after the incident, an infection attributed to the pinch caused the fisherman’s leg to swell to the point where it had to be amputated. But it was too late—a bacteria-borne blood infection already had spread through his body, and the fisherman died. Data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Terra and Aqua Earth observing satellites helped provide one potential clue behind this mysterious death. The cause was a waterborne bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, and Mark Trice had the MODIS imagery to show how this lethal microorganism could have found a home in Chesapeake Bay.

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https://products.coastalscience.noaa.gov/vibrioforecast/chesapeake/default.aspx

NCCOS  Vibrio Predictive Models

Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) in Chesapeake Bay Oysters at Harvest
Vibrio concentrations in Oysters harvested from bottom waters of Chesapeake Bay are related to the temperature and salinity.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) in Chesapeake Bay Oysters, Post-Harvest
Once an oyster is harvested, Vp will continue to grow within the organism until it is placed under refrigeration and cooled to 50°F.

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Michael Nunnally writes  “Take note of these varying strains:”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5242489/

Genetic Analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 Strains That Have Been Isolated in Mexico Since 1998

Published online 2017 Jan 18.    PLoS One. 2017; 12(1): e0169722.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen that has been isolated worldwide from clinical cases, most of which have been associated with seafood consumption. Environmental and clinical toxigenic strains of V. parahaemolyticus that were isolated in Mexico from 1998 to 2012, including those from the only outbreak that has been reported in this country, were characterized genetically to assess the presence of the O3:K6 pandemic clone, and their genetic relationship to strains that are related to the pandemic clonal complex (CC3). Pathogenic tdh+ and tdh+/trh+ strains were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Also, the entire genome of a Mexican O3:K6 strain was sequenced. Most of the strains were tdh/ORF8-positive and corresponded to the O3:K6 serotype. By PFGE and MLST, there was very close genetic relationship between ORF8/O3:K6 strains, and very high genetic diversities from non-pandemic strains. The genetic relationship is very close among O3:K6 strains that were isolated in Mexico and sequences that were available for strains in the CC3, based on the PubMLST database. The whole-genome sequence of CICESE-170 strain had high similarity with that of the reference RIMD 2210633 strain, and harbored 7 pathogenicity islands, including the 4 that denote O3:K6 pandemic strains. These results indicate that pandemic strains that have been isolated in Mexico show very close genetic relationship among them and with those isolated worldwide.