This entire research was conducted by Ann Rose Laurence.

City of New Orleans, Confederate Patriots, Antifa, Black Lives Matter Protests
LOUISIANA FLEUR DE LIS – WITH CONFEDERACY MONUMENTS
The Fleur de lis photo. 1861 – 1865 shown is the period of the American Civil War. At the bottom is a concrete memorial, “Only the dead have seen the end of war” ~ PLATO ~ This concrete memorial is in Louisiana and the two tombstones at the bottom of the LA Fleur de lis is in honor of Unknown Solders USA – 1845. The one on the right is 1845 also and to “Unknown Soldiers – Confederate States of America” and of course “the period flags” of the US and Confederate

P.G.T. BEAUREGARD EQUESTRIAN STATUE; JEFFERSON DAVIS MONUMENT; AND ROBERT E. LEE MONUMENT

SECTION 1 — THE BEGINNING — REMOVAL OF CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS:
New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and 5 of the NOLA Council pushed for the removal of Confederate monuments within the City of New Orleans in 2015, dubbing them “nuisances” in the aftermath of the racially-inspired mass shooting at the Charleston Emanuel AME church. The shooter was Dylan Roof who went into the Emmanuel AME Church in Charlotte, South Carolina and killed 9 innocent church members on June 17, 2015. He simply wanted to kill some people. — Roof ignited this Confederate Flag war. The photo below on his personal FB internet social account triggered the cry for “Abolish the Confederate Flag”. (NOTE: This same hate filled murderer also had a social media photo of him burning a USA flag — that one was ignored.) Soon afterwards, Confederate flags were being banned everywhere, one state even had a 100 year old grave dug up and the Confederate general buried there and his wife were moved for re-internment elsewhere. Next came the Confederate statues and monuments across the nation. People fail to realize THE EVIL WAS DYLAN ROOF, not a flag.

NO ONE BOTHERED TO READ HISTORY — the North and South War (Confederacy and Union) were not even fighting about slavery. The war began because of the Morrill Tarriff that was over burdensome to crop and product producers. Slaves were actually owned by North and South and even by some Blacks who had once been indentured slaves and obtained their freedom and 50 acres, with crop seeds for their freedom rights.
New Orleans Mayor Landrieu even admitted this back in 2015 when he started with action to remove NOLA Confederate monuments that it was because of Dylan Roof and his massacre in Charlotte. IN REALITY, IT SHOULD REALLY BE ABOUT HATE — NOT A FLAG – NOR HISTORY.
WHAT STIRRED UP THE CONFEDERATE FLAG ISSUE AND TURNED IT INTO A NATIONAL CRISIS OF HATE?
DYLAN ROOF — A HATE FILLED RACIST — who went into the Emmanuel AME Church in Charlotte, South Carolina and killed 9 innocent church members on June 17, 2015. He simply wanted to kill some people. — Roof ignited this Confederate Flag war. This photo posting below shared on his personal internet account — triggered the cry for “Abolish the Confederate Flag”. Soon Confederate flags were being banned everywhere — one state even had a 100 year old grave dug up and the Confederate general buried there and his wife were moved for re-internment elsewhere.
People fail to realize THE EVIL WAS DYLAN ROOF, not a flag!

SECTION 2 — SPEAKING OF SLAVES:
JUST ONE MONTH BEFORE THE CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS BECAME A DEBATE — NOLA MADE PLANS TO ERECT A SLAVE SHIP MUSEUM
WDSU 6 — National Slave Ship Museum wins support of City Council, Updated: 11:37 AM CDT May 16, 2015, Gina Swanson, Anchor
>>A National Slave Ship Museum (NSSM). This project was first proposed back in 2001 and again in 2013. It will be a reminder of the human cargo that was traded along the river in centuries past when massive cargo ships were traveling the Mississippi River daily. The costs of the NSSM is projected at more than 100 million dollars and to be constructed along the Riverfront. Thursday, May 14, 2015, the city council passed a resolution in support of the museum.
Source – WDSU
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Although approved, the National Slave Ship Museum has never been constructed because of lack of funding, NOR has the approval to build it ever been cancelled or withdrawn. It remains on the back burner – in limbo.

SECTION 3 — CITY MEETINGS REGARDING MONUMENTS REMOVAL AND RENAMING JEFFERSON DAVIS PARKWAY:
>>CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, OFFICE OF THE MAYOR — JULY 09, 2015 — Landrieu Outlines Process to Relocate Prominent Confederate Monuments; Also Suggests Renaming Jefferson Davis Parkway; Calls for 60-Day Public Discussion Period before Ultimate Council Vote
>>Today, Mayor Mitch Landrieu formally requested that the City Council begin the process to consider relocating four prominent Confederate monuments in New Orleans and to rename Jefferson Davis Parkway. During remarks to the City Council, Landrieu called on the City to begin a 60-day period of facilitated discussions and public meetings – in conjunction with the City’s Human Relations Commission, the Mayor’s Welcome Table initiative and the City Council. The goal of this process is to offer opportunities for the people of New Orleans to discuss the renaming of Jefferson Davis Parkway and the relocation of prominent Confederate monuments. These monuments include: the Robert E Lee statue at Lee Circle; the Jefferson Davis statue on Jefferson Davis Parkway; the PGT Beauregard equestrian statue on Esplanade Avenue at the entrance to City Park; and, the Battle of Liberty Place Monument at Iberville Street.
Source – NOLA.gov
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NOLA The TIMES-PICAYUNE — July 21, 2015 at 9:55 AM — Confederate New Orleans: An interactive monument and street map, by Dan Swenson
>>Controversy continues to simmer over Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s call for the city to remove four Confederate monuments and rename Jefferson Davis Parkway.
>>Any attempt to identify all of New Orleans streets and landmarks linked to the Confederacy invites controversy itself. This interactive map attempts that task.
Source – NOLA.gov
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FLORIDA COURIER — December 31, 2015 — New Orleans votes to remove Confederate monuments, Posted by FCEditor
>>After several hours of heated debate, the New Orleans City Council has voted 6-1 to declare four Confederate-era monuments a nuisance, paving the way for their removal from prominent locations around the city.
>>New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, surrounded by six of the seven New Orleans council members, signs ordinance calling for the relocation of four Confederate monuments from prominent locations in New Orleans on Dec. 17. The lone dissenting vote Dec. 17 was cast by Councilwoman Stacy Head.
>>No timetable has been set for the removal of what many Black residents have called offensive monuments, and some anticipate that the effort to remove these monuments is far from over with legal challenges to block the majority-Black council from moving forward with its effort
Source – flcourier
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SECTION 4 — NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES, ORLEANS PARISH:
WIKIPEDIA — National Register of Historic Places listings in Orleans Parish, Louisiana
>>This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, United States, which is consolidated with the city of New Orleans. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a map.
>>There are 168 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the parish, including 25 National Historic Landmarks. Three properties were once listed, but have since been removed.
>>This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 2, 2017
*** GENERAL P.G.T. BEAUREGARD — LISTING # 7
*** GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE — LISTING # 79
Source – Wikipedia
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SECTION 5 — CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS SUITS FILED:
>>Just hours after the council vote, four organizations filed a federal lawsuit against the City of New Orleans in an effort to block the removal of the Confederate-era monuments from their current public spaces.
>>The lawsuit, filed by the Louisiana Landmark Society, the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, the Monumental Task Committee and Beauregard Camp No. 130, contends that removing the monuments would violate several federal and state laws, including Louisiana’s constitution.
>>The case will be handled by U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier.
(MORE SUITS WOULD FOLLOW: 2015 – 2017.)
WGNO — Judge rules Beauregard statue belongs to City of N.O., Posted: 11:22 a.m., May 10, 2017, Updated: 1:41 p.m., May 10, 2017 NEW ORLEANS – A judge ruled this afternoon that a statue of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard does, in fact, belong to the City of New Orleans.
The ruling comes after a surprise declaration by the Monumental Task Force earlier this week that the statue, which sits at the entrance to City Park, actually belongs to the park.
>>Judge Kern Reese handed down the ruling just before 11:00 a.m. this morning reaffirming the city’s ownership of the disputed statue, clearing the way for its removal.
Source – WGNO
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WGNO — Judge denies temporary restraining order to keep PGT Beauregard monument up
Posted: 5:03 p.m., May 8, 2017
>>NEW ORLEANS — A judge has denied a request by the Monumental Task Force to leave the PGT Beauregard monument in place until a hearing is held Wednesday to determine whether the city owns the statue that stands in the entrance to City Park.
>>The hearing will still take place on Wednesday, but a civil court judge denied the lawsuit’s request for a temporary straining order that would have prevented the monument from being removed before the hearing.
Source – WJNO
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WGNO — Monumental Task Committee says City doesn’t own Beauregard statue
Posted: 10:46 a.m., May 8, 2017 | Updated: 11:06 a.m., May 8, 2017
>>NEW ORLEANS – The City of New Orleans may not own a statue of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard that stands at the entrance to City Park and is slated to come down.
>>Tulane University Professor Richard Marksbury of the Monumental Task Committee, a volunteer group dedicated to preserving all monuments in New Orleans, said the statue in question has never been the property of the City of New Orleans.
>>“City Park, as an incorporated association of the Lieutenant Governor’s Office, owns the land that the monument is on, and owns the monument,” Marksbury said.
>>Marksbury led a lawsuit against the city aimed at preventing the removal of any of the four statues the City Council has declared a “public nuisance” – the Beauregard statue, a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, the statue of Robert E. Lee in Lee Circle, and the recently removed Liberty Place monument.
Source – WJNO
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SECTION 6 — DYLAN ROOF, CHARLESTON CHURCH SHOOTING, CONFEDERATE FLAG:
WIKIPEDIA — CHARLESTON CHURCH SHOOTING
“2015 Charleston shooting” – Part of Terrorism in the United States
Location – Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church
Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.
Date: June 17, 2015
Perpetrator – Dylan Roof (sentenced to death)[5]
Motive – White supremacy
The Charleston church shooting (also known as the Charleston church massacre was a mass shooting, that took place at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, United States, on the evening of June 17, 2015. During a prayer service, nine people (including the senior pastor, state senator Clementa C. Pinckney) were killed by gunman Dylan Roof, a 21-year-old white supremacist.
Source – Wikipedia
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SECTION 7 — CONFEDERACY MANIA:
A GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF THE 2015 – 2017 CONFEDERACY MANIA:
The New Orleans Confederate monuments removal would become one of the most sweeping gestures undertaken by any U.S. city to sever ties with America’s Confederate history.
WANE — December 16, 2015, 4:25 pm Updated: December 16, 2015, 4:32 pm — New Orleans considers removing Confederate monuments
>>“This has never happened before,” said Charles Kelly Barrow, commander-in-chief of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. “I’ve never heard of a city trying to sweep (away) all Confederate monuments.”
>>Geographers have identified at least 872 parks, natural features, schools, streets and other locations named for major Confederate leaders in 44 states, according to a mapping project. Barrow said more than a thousand statues and monuments and countless plaques also honor Confederate battles and heroes.
>>What’s happening in New Orleans reflects a new effort to rethink all this history: Confederate iconography is being questioned across the nation, and in some places falling from public view.
>>“It is a grand scale of symbolic rewriting of the landscape,” said Derek Alderman, a geographer at the University of Tennessee who is mapping Confederate symbolism nationwide. “It certainly represents a wholesale re-questioning of the legitimacy of remembering the Confederacy so publicly.”
>>Barrow said he and others will sue if necessary to keep the monuments where they are.
>> “I’m going to do everything in my power to take on these people,” Barrow said. “I’m not going to let this happen under my administration.”
(THE DYLAN ROOF CHARLOTTE MASACRE FACTOR) Landrieu first proposed taking down these monuments after police said a white supremacist killed nine parishioners inside the African-American Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina in June. “Supremacy may be a part of our past, but it should not be part of our future,” he declared.
>>Anti-Confederate sentiment has grown since then around the country, along with protests against police mistreatment, as embodied by the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement.
>>South Carolina and Alabama removed Confederate battle flags from their Capitol grounds after the shooting. The University of Mississippi took down the state flag because it includes the Confederate emblem. The University of Texas demoted its statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis to a history museum.
>>In New Orleans, the mayor asked the council to take a closer look at monuments that have long been part of the city’s landscape.
Source – wane
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SECTION 8 — REMOVING THE MONUMENTS:
HISTORY IN THE HEADLINES — A Tale of Two Cities: New Orleans and the Fight Over Confederate Monuments, MAY 11, 2017 By Mary Niall Mitchell
Source – History.com
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Two of the three noble Confederates, who had their monuments removed in New Orleans have been remembered for their birthdays: PIERRE GUSTAVE TOUTANT (P. G. T.) BEAUREGARD — (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) – monument erected: November 11, 1915, removed on: May 16-17, 2017; and JEFFERSON FINIS DAVIS (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) – monument erected: February 22, 1911, removed on: May 11, 2017. The third Confederate monument removed was: ROBERT EDWARD LEE (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) — monument erected: February 22, 1884, removed on: May 19, 2017.
P.G.T. BEAUREGARD EQUESTRIAN STATUE; JEFFERSON DAVIS MONUMENT; AND ROBERT E. LEE MONUMENT

TIMELINE OF NEW ORLEANS MONUMENTS REMOVALS:
Liberty Place Monument — April 24, 2017, after midnight
Jefferson Davis Monument — May 11, 2017, started 3:00 A.M.
P.G.T. Beauregard Equestrian Statue — May 16-17, 2017, started 3:00 A.M.
Robert E. Lee — May 19, 2017, started 9:30 A.M.
The crews removing the monuments were actually members of the New Orleans Association of Black Firefighters’ (paid, not volunteers). They were: helmeted, hooded, and illegally masked (NOLA has a law against public masking except for Mardi Gras parades and for the annual Halloween night celebrations.)

SECTION 9 — LIBERTY PLACE MONUMENT:
WWL 4 NEWS — What is the ‘Battle of Liberty Place’ monument? (WITH VIDEO, PHOTOS)
Source – WWLTV
Archive Link
FOX 8 NEWS – Liberty Place monument removal stokes strong emotions, raises new questions
Monday, April 24th 2017, 8:35 pm CDT, Monday, April 24th 2017, 8:58 pm CDT
Written by: Kimberly Curth, Reporter (WITH VIDEO)
Source – Fox8live
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WIKIPEDIA — The Battle of Liberty Place Monument is a stone obelisk on an inscribed plinth, formerly on display in New Orleans, in the U.S. state of Louisiana, commemorating the “Battle of Liberty Place”, an 1874 attempt by Democratic White League paramilitary organizations to take control of the government of Louisiana from its Reconstruction Era Republican leadership after a disputed gubernatorial election.
>>Erected in 1891 by a white-dominated city government, the obelisk became the site of protests and rallies by both white supremacists and those who objected to it as a symbol of racism. It was removed in 2017 amid great controversy and threats of violence, and was placed in storage.
Source – Wikipedia
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SECTION 10 — JEFFERSON DAVIS MONUMENT:
WWL 4 NEWS — Jeff Davis monument comes down after 106 years (WITH VIDEOS)
Source – WWLTV
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LOUISIANA DIGITAL LIBRARY — History and description of the Jefferson Davis Monument in New Orleans, from the 1930s. (3 PAGES)
Source – Louisiana Digital Library
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JEFFERSON DAVIS MONUMENT – JUNE 3, 1808 TIME CAPSULE CONTENTS (in base of monument):
Source  – Imgur                                                                                      THE JEFFERSON DAVIS MONUMENT — HISTORICAL “TIME CAPSULE” … where is Mayor Landrieu planning to move it to? Here is an archived newspaper article on the Jefferson Davis Monument Time Capsule and what it contains:
Included in the HISTORICAL MEMORABILIA is a “roll of the Army of Tennessee, Louisiana Division — and $655 in Confederacy money and a $1 New Orleans money bill — plus various coins of the day and during the Confederacy period — Value: PRICELESS
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE RESEARCH INFORMATION CENTER (SIRIC) – ART INVENTORY CATALOG:
Jefferson Davis Monument, (sculpture).
Artist: Valentine, Edward Virginius, 1838-1930, sculptor.
Albert Weiblen Marble & Granite Works, fabricator.
Gorham Manufacturing Company, founder.
Title: Jefferson Davis Monument, (sculpture).
Other Titles: Jeff Davis Monument, (sculpture).
Dates: Dedicated Feb. 22, 1911.
WWL4 NEWS — Anti-monument protesters chant, burn flags at Jefferson Davis monument (WITH VIDEOS)
Source – WWLTV
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THE GAMBIT — 57 PHOTOS — TUESDAY, MAY 2, 2017, CIVIL RIGHTS
Photos from the May 1 protest at the Jefferson Davis monument in New Orleans
Posted by Cheryl Gerber, May 2, 2017 AT 4:46 PM
Source – bestofneworleans
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WGNO – Crews remove Jefferson Davis monument
Posted: 4:36 a.m., May 11, 2017 | Updated: 7:59 a.m., May 11, 2017
Source – WGNO
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WIKIPEDIA – The Jefferson Davis Monument, also known as the Jefferson Davis Memorial, was an outdoor sculpture and memorial to Jefferson Davis, installed at Jeff Davis Parkway and Canal Street in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States from 1911 to 2017.
Source – Wikipedia
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WIKIPEDIA — JEFFERSON FINIS DAVIS
Source – Wikipedia
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JEFFERSON FINIS DAVIS — did own a large cotton plantation in Mississippi and at one time had perhaps 74 slaves. He married Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of his commanding officer, future president Zachary Taylor. By 1835, Davis only had one slave, James Pemberton, who often traveled with him. He promoted Pemberton to be the overseer of this fields and purchased 16 slaves. By 1860, he owned 113 slaves for his fields.

Part 2 to be released soon.

 

This entire research was conducted by Ann Rose Laurence.