The Missing 13th Amendment to the Constitution “Titles of Nobility” & “Honor” Amendment

“TITLES OF NOBILITY” AND “HONOR”

In the winter of 1983, archival research expert David Dodge, and former Baltimore police investigator Tom Dunn, were searching for evidence of government corruption in public records stored in the Belfast Library on the coast of Maine. In the process, they discovered the library’s oldest authentic copy of the Constitution of the United States (printed in 1825). They were stunned to see this document included a “missing” 13th Amendment but not the current 13th Amendment of the Constitution we are familiar with in this century.

Since 1983, Dodge and Dunn have uncovered additional copies of the Constitution with the “missing” 13th Amendment printed in at least eighteen separate publications by ten different states and territories over four decades from 1822 to 1860.  After studying the Amendment’s language and historical context, they realized the principle intent of this “missing” 13th Amendment was to prohibit lawyers from serving in government.  The implications are enormous since the Amendment was never lawfully repealed, it is still the Law today.

13th-amendment

The “missing” 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads as follows:

“If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them.” [Emphasis added.}

Let’s consider some of the historical significance of this : First, “titles of nobility” were prohibited in both Article VI of the Articles of Confederation (1777) and in Article I, Sect. 9 of the Constitution of the United States (1778); Second, although already prohibited by the Constitution, an additional “title of nobility” amendment was proposed in 1789, again in 1810, and according to Dodge, finally ratified in 1819. Clearly, the founding fathers saw such a serious threat in “titles of nobility” and “honors” that anyone receiving them would forfeit their citizenship. Since the government prohibited “titles of nobility” several times over four decades, and went through the amending process (even though “titles of nobility” were already prohibited by the Constitution), it’s obvious that the Amendment carried much more significance for our founding fathers than is readily apparent today.

Historically, the British peerage system referred to knights as “Squires” and to those who bore the knight’s shields as “Esquires”. As lances, shields, and physical violence gave way to the more civilized means of theft, the pen grew mightier (and more profitable) than the sword, and the clever wielders of those pens (bankers and lawyers) came to hold titles of nobility. The most common title was “Esquire” (used, even today, by some lawyers).

INTERNATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION

In Colonial America, attorneys trained attorneys but most held no “title of nobility” or “honor”. There was no requirement that one be a lawyer to hold the position of district attorney, attorney general, or judge; a citizen’s “counsel of choice” was not restricted to a lawyer; there were no state or national bar associations. The only organization that certified lawyers was the International Bar Association (IBA), chartered by the King of England, headquartered in London, and closely associated with the international banking system. Lawyers admitted to the IBA received the rank “Esquire” — a “title of nobility”.

“Esquire” was the principle title of nobility which the 13th Amendment sought to prohibit from the United States. Why? Because the loyalty of “Esquire” lawyers was suspect. Bankers and lawyers with an “Esquire” behind their names were agents of the monarchy, members of an organization whose principle purposes were political, not economic, and regarded with the same wariness that some people today reserve for members of the KGB or the CIA.

Article 1, Sect. 9 of the Constitution sought to prohibit the International Bar Association (or any other agency that granted titles of nobility) from operating in America. But the Constitution neglected to specify a penalty, so the prohibition was ignored, and agents of the monarchy continued to infiltrate and influence the government (as in the Jay Treaty and the US Bank charter incidents). Therefore, a “title of nobility” amendment that specified a penalty (loss of citizenship) was proposed in 1789, and again in 1810. The meaning of the amendment is seen in its intent to prohibit persons having titles of nobility and loyalties foreign governments and bankers from voting, holding public office, or using their skills to subvert the government.

On March 12, 1819 the State of Virginia, with the enactment and publication of the laws of Virginia, became the 13th and FINAL state required to ratify the above article of amendment to the Constitution For The United States, thus making it the Law Of The Land. With the enactment of Act No. 280, March 12, 1819, which was Voted, En Bloc, and publication of the Revised Code, the State of Virginia notified the Department of State, the Congress, the Library of Congress, and the President of their action by issuing to each a copy of the Laws of Virginia. [See VA 1819 Images] . In fact, the Journal of the Virginia Senate; Tuesday, May 1st, 1810 (Pages 511-512 shows that the resolution to amend was properly enrolled and ratified on that date by the Virginia House and Senate, to be laid before the President of the United States, therefore the first state to ratify.

Found in late March, 2006, a very high quality private publication published in 1855 before the start of the War Between The States, Echoes From The Cabinet, is unusual in having an onionskin insert showing facsimile signatures of the signers of the Declaration of Independence in addition to the Constitution with the 13th Titles of Nobility and Honour Amendment in place on page 38, opposite the frontise to the Declaration of Independence.

 

Front Cover – Whig Almanac – 1845

     

The “Military Laws of the United States to which is prefixed the Constitution of the United States“, authorized by Secretary of War John C. Calhoun, is published in 1825.

  

  

The Constitution requires three-quarters of the states to ratify a proposed amendment before it may be added to the Constitution. When Congress proposed the “Title of Nobility” in 1810, there were seventeen states, thirteen of which would have to ratify for the Amendment to be adopted. According to the National Archives, the following is a list of the twelve states that ratified, and their dates of ratification:

   Maryland,         Dec. 25, 1810
   Kentucky,         Jan. 31, 1811
   Ohio,             Jan. 31, 1811
   Delaware,         Feb.  2, 1811
   Pennsylvania,     Feb.  6, 1811
   New Jersey,       Feb. 13, 1811
   Vermont,          Oct. 24, 1811
   Tennessee,        Nov. 21, 1811
   Georgia,          Dec. 13, 1811
   North Carolina,   Dec. 23, 1811
   Massachusetts,    Feb. 27, 1812
   New Hampshire,    Dec. 10, 1812

Here is a chronological timeline where the original 13th Amendment is including in numerous instances and publications such as the ones shown above.

 

The True Back Story Of The Missing 13th Amendment | The ...

 

For additional information on this fascinating topic go to:

TheMillenniumReport

ConstitutionCenter

Amendment-13.org

Anti-CorruptionSociety

FederalJack

Barefootsworld