President Donald J. Trump Proclaims January 15, 2018, as the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday

White House Proclamations

Issued on: January 12, 2018

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., dedicated his life to a vision:  that all Americans would live free from injustice and enjoy equal opportunity as children of God.  His strong, peaceful, and lifelong crusade against segregation and discrimination brought our Nation closer to the founding ideals set forth in the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.  Today, as we come together to honor Dr. King, we know that America is stronger, more just, and more free because of his life and work.
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. King, who was tragically assassinated on April 4, 1968.  As we approach this solemn milestone, we acknowledge our Nation’s continuing debt to Dr. King’s legacy.  Dr. King advocated for the world we still demand — where the sacred rights of all Americans are protected, rural and urban communities are prosperous from coast to coast, and our limits and our opportunities are defined not by the color of our skin, but by the content of our character.  We remember the immense promise of liberty that lies at the foundation of our great Republic, the responsibility it demands from all of us who claim its benefits, and the many sacrifices of those who have come before us.
Too often, however, we have neglected these ideals, and injustice has seeped into our politics and our society.  Dr. King’s peaceful crusade for justice and equality opened our Nation’s eyes to the humbling truth that we were very far from fulfilling our obligation to the promises set forth by our forebearers.
The Reverend’s devotion to fighting the injustice of segregation and discrimination ignited the American spirit of fraternity and reminded us of our higher purpose.  Through his words and work, he compelled us to hold ourselves to standards of moral character and integrity that are worthy of our Nation and of our humanity.
Dr. King once said:  “We refuse to believe there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this Nation.”  We must work together to carry forward the American Dream, to ensure it is within reach not only for our children, but for future generations.  As your President, I am committed to building and preserving a Nation where every American has opportunities to achieve a bright future.  That is why we are expanding apprenticeship programs, preparing Americans for the jobs of our modernizing economy.  We are also working every day to enhance access to capital and networks for minority and women entrepreneurs.  With all we do, we aim to empower Americans to pursue their dreams.
Importantly, in paying tribute to Dr. King, we are reminded that the duty lies with each of us to fulfill the vision of his life’s work.  Let us use our time, talents, and resources to give back to our communities and help those less fortunate than us. Particularly today, let us not forget Dr. King’s own tireless spirit and efforts, as we work, celebrate, and pray alongside people of all backgrounds.  As one people, let us rediscover the bonds of love and loyalty that bring us together as Americans, and as people who share a common humanity.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 15, 2018, as the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday.  I encourage all Americans to observe this day with appropriate civic, community, and service programs and activities in honor of Dr. King’s life and legacy.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-second.

White House Logo

January 12, 2018.  [1]

HYSTERIA: Media screams "s***hole" questions at Trump after he honors Martin Luther King Jr.


Martin Luther King Jr. Day (officially Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.) is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around King’s birthday, January 15. – Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King press conference 01269u edit.jpg

Martin Luther King Jr. in 1964

King was the chief spokesperson for nonviolent activism in the Civil Rights Movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. The campaign for a federal holiday in King’s honor began soon after his assassination in 1968. President Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed three years later. At first, some states resisted observing the holiday as such, giving it alternative names or combining it with other holidays. It was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000. [2]


President Donald Trump signed a measure Monday creating a new national historic park for Martin Luther King Jr.  The law creates the first national historic park in the state of Georgia.  The legislation expands the boundaries of the former Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta to include the Prince Hall Masonic Temple, a site that King used as the headquarters for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, according to a White House spokesman. [3]


The Nobel Peace Prize 1964
Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Nobel Prize program signed by Martin Luther KIng up for auction - NY Daily NewsAtlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor.Dr. Martin Luther King Jr |

At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement.

On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated. [4]

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr. and others look on. East Room, White House, Washington DC, on 7 February 1964. Source: Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum. Photo: Yoichi R. Okamoto



[1] White

[2] Wikipedia

[3] CNN

[4] Nobel Prize